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English, 03.12.2019 00:57 Ancelingabaut

10 points will be given, i have little time to do this. !

it all began with effie's getting something in her eye. it hurt very much indeed, and it felt something like a red-hot spark—only it seemed to have legs as well, and wings like a fly. effie rubbed and cried—not real crying, but the kind your eye does all by itself without your being miserable inside your mind—and then she went to her father to have the thing in her eye taken out. effie's father was a doctor, so of course, he knew how to take things out of eyes.

when he had gotten the thing out, he said: "this is very curious." effie had often got things in her eye before, and her father had always seemed to think it was natural—rather tiresome and naughty perhaps, but still natural. he had never before thought it curious.

effie stood holding her handkerchief to her eye, and said: "i don't believe it's out." people always say this when they have had something in their eyes.

"oh, yes—it's out," said the doctor. "here it is, on the brush. this is very interesting."

effie had never heard her father say that about anything that she had any share in. she said: "what? "

the doctor carried the brush very carefully across the room, and held the point of it under his microscope—then he twisted the brass screws of the microscope and looked through the top with one eye.

"dear me," he said. "dear, dear me! four well-developed limbs; a long caudal appendage; five toes, unequal in lengths, almost like one of the lacertidae, yet there are traces of wings." the creature under his eye wriggled a little in the castor oil, and he went on: "yes; a bat-like wing. a new specimen, undoubtedly. effie, run round to the professor and ask him to be kind enough to step in for a few minutes."

"you might give me sixpence, daddy," said effie, "because i did bring you the new specimen. i took great care of it inside my eye, and my eye does hurt."

the doctor was so with the new specimen that he gave effie a shilling, and presently the professor stepped round. he stayed to lunch, and he and the doctor quarreled very happily all afternoon about the name and the family of the thing that had come out of effie's eye.

but at teatime, another thing happened. effie's brother harry fished something out of his tea, which he thought at first was an earwig. he was just getting ready to drop it on the floor, and end its life in the usual way, when it shook itself in the spoon—spread two wet wings, and flopped onto the tablecloth. there it sat, stroking itself with its feet and stretching its wings, and harry said: "why it's a tiny newt! "

the professor leaned forward before the doctor could say a word. "i'll give you half a crown for it, harry, my lad," he said, speaking very fast; and then he picked it up carefully on his handkerchief.

"it is a new specimen," he said, "and finer than yours, doctor."

it was a tiny lizard, about half an inch long—with scales and wings.

so now the doctor and the professor each had a specimen, and they were both very . but before long these specimens began to seem less valuable. for the next morning, when the knife-boy was cleaning the doctor's boots, he suddenly dropped the brushes and the boot and the blacking and screamed out that he was burnt.

and from inside the boot came crawling a lizard as big as a kitten, with large, shiny wings.

"why," said effie, "i know what it is. it is a dragon-like the one st. george killed."

and effie was right. that afternoon towser was bitten in the garden by a dragon about the size of a rabbit, which he had tried to chase, and the next morning all the papers were full of the wonderful "winged lizards" that were appearing all over the country. the papers would not call them dragons, because, of course, no one believes in dragons nowadays—and at any rate, the papers were not going to be so silly as to believe in fairy stories. at first, there were only a few, but in a week or two the country was simply running alive with dragons of all sizes, and in the air, you could sometimes see them as thick as a swarm of bees. they all looked alike except as to size. they were green with scales, and they had four legs and a long tail and great wings like bats' wings, only the wings were a pale, half-transparent yellow, like the gear-boxes on bicycles.

which words from the story suggest something mysterious is about to happen? be sure to use details from the text to support your answer.

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